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Why Get A New Home Inspected?

SINCE 1972

I am very particular with the referral partners I work with. Referring my clients to a house inspector who will educate, understand, and go the extra mile for my clients is so important. Brad Hanson from Hanson Inspections has proven himself to be one of the best home inspectors I have had to privilege to work with over the years. Here is Brad letting giving us a few tips on why a new home should be inspected.

There are some very important reasons why new home buyers should always get a home inspection done before purchasing. Buying a new home is an exciting experience, with great opportunities to pick your finishes, choose your colours, and to decide what floor coverings you want.  But with all the excitement of choosing your decor and finding your new daily route to work, don’t forget to have your new home inspected.  While it’s best to have your first home inspection when the home is in the early phases of construction, when more of the home is visible, it’s still a good idea once it is all finished.

New homes can have a wide variety of problems. Building a home is a complex and often complicated orchestration involving many different subcontractors and their employees, each working on a different system of the house. Each subcontractor has their own set of priorities and commitments. These are not always in line with the builder or the homeowner! While the vast majority of home builders want to build the best home possible, it is very difficult for any builder to carefully inspect each and every portion of each phase of the construction process. With all the different phases happening at once, even the best builders will likely miss something.

Municipal building inspections are not the same as home inspections. The responsibility of the municipal building inspector is to check for compliance to the local building codes for that area.  Building codes are based on minimum industry standards. Even so, while most municipal building inspectors are doing their best to keep a close eye on things, they are often hindered by factors and circumstances beyond their control, and this alone will not be effective enough for quality control.

Problems found before you purchase the home can be fixed before moving in to your new home. This can save you from having to deal with dust and noise from repairs being made, or from the inconvenience of having to stay home from work while workers are in your home. While there will likely be some small touch ups and repairs required after you move in, you will want the builder to fix any significant repairs right away.

Defects can be repaired before they result in serious or substantial damages or costs to you. Safety items, such as gas leaks or electrical hazards need to be addressed to protect you and your family. Missing attic insulation that will result in higher utility bills can be installed. Raised shingles, which can lead to water damages such as rotted roof sheathing, should be repaired before you take possession of your new home.

These issues, and having the proper repairs made, matter for resale and they will matter for your peace of mind. When you decide to sell your formerly new home, the buyer will likely get a home inspection. Deficiencies that date back to the original construction will undoubtedly be discovered, even if you did not know that they existed. At this point, it is usually too late to get the builder involved, and these problems are now your own.  Your potential buyer will, in all likelihood, either ask that you have these repairs made, or they will lower their offering price to cover the cost of the repairs.

A home inspection on your new home will also allow you to learn about the necessary upkeep and maintenance of your home. A proper home inspection will do more than just identify deficiencies and necessary repairs to be made.  It will also highlight many important maintenance steps and requirements that will enable you to protect your investment and the ongoing enjoyment of your problem free home.

As you can see, having a home inspection on your new home can more than pay for itself, both monetarily and with the peace of mind and confidence that comes with knowing your new home is ready to for you to fully enjoy well into the future.

Have a few more questions about home inspections? Connect with Brad through his website.

Maintaining Your Home: Laundry and Utility Rooms

Autumn

I am very particular with the referral partners I work with. Referring my clients to a house inspector who will educate, understand, and go the extra mile for my clients is so important. Brad Hanson from Hanson Inspections has proven himself to be one of the best home inspectors I have had to privilege to work with over the years. Here is Brad letting giving us a few tips on how to maintain and upgrade a few specific rooms in our homes.

 

There are a few things every homeowner should know to help him or her get the most out of their home. Each month, you’ll find plenty of useful information for keeping your house in great condition so that you can enjoy it for years to come. Preserve your investment, and keep your family safe and healthy, by maintaining your home using the following tips.

Laundry and Utility Rooms

Laundry Room: Watch for leaks and kinks developing at plumbing connections to the washing machine. Water can overflow from the top or bottom if the machine is overloaded with a load that’s too big, or if it is resting on an uneven surface.
Protect the electrical or natural gas connections to the dryer and ensure that they are not disturbed or accidentally dislodged from their connections.
A gas dryer vent that passes through walls or combustible materials must be made of metal. The length of a dryer exhaust ensures that its blower will be able to push sufficient air volume to take away the laundry’s damp air and lint. The maximum length of the exhaust hose should not be greater than 25 feet from the dryer to the termination at the wall or roof. The length can be increased only when the make and model of the dryer are known.
Inspect the dryer venting to make sure it is not clogged or restricted, which will help the unit operate efficiently and normally, as well as prevent the unit’s motor from overheating and failing. A clogged or restricted vent hose may also lead to an accidental fire caused by the ignition from built-up debris.
The clothes dryer exhaust poses a different problem than other exhaust systems because the air is damp and carries lint. Ensure that the vent exhausts go to the outside and not to the attic, crawlspace, or attached garage, because the wooden structural members of the house could be affected over time. The exhaust vent’s termination should have a backdraft damper installed to prevent cold air, rain, snow, rodents, and birds from entering the vent. The vent termination should not have a screen on it, as this can trap lint and other debris and pose a fire hazard.

Furnace Room: Rooms or closets containing combustion or fuel-burning equipment or appliances should not be located off a bedroom in a single-family residence (and must be in a publicly accessible area in a multi-family building).

Retaining Walls

If possible, weep holes and related drains should be assessed following a heavy rain to make sure they are working properly. If they are not discharging water, the drains should be cleaned out and observed again in the next rain. Retaining walls more than 2 feet high should be backed with drainage material, such as gravel. There should be drains at the bottom of the drainage material that should discharge the water either at the end of the wall or through pipes. These drains and the drainage material behind the wall relieve the pressure of groundwater on the wall. Failure to drain could be remedied by excavating behind the wall, replacing the drainage material and damaged drainage piping, and backfilling. In all but the driest climates, improper drainage of water from behind a retaining wall can cause the wall to fail.
Look for movement in your retaining walls. Bowing (vertical bulges), sweeping (horizontal bulges), and cracking in retaining walls can be caused by water pressure (or hydrostatic pressure). Bulging can also be a result of inadequate strength to resist the load of the earth behind the wall. Bowing and sweeping failures may be correctable if found early enough and if the cause is poor drainage.
There are other types of failures of retaining walls. Failure by over-turning (leaning from the top) or sliding may be caused by inadequate wall strength. In addition, water behind a wall can create unstable earth, especially in clay soils, and contribute to sliding. Retaining walls also fail due to settlement and heaving. Settlement occurs whenever filled earth below the wall compacts soon after the wall is built, or when wet earth caused by poor drainage dries out and soil consolidates. In cold climates, poor drainage contributes to failure by creating heaving from frozen ground. Both overturning and sliding earth may be stabilized and sometimes corrected if the amount of movement is not extreme. Settling may be corrected on small, low walls of concrete or masonry, and heaving may be controlled by proper drainage. Significant failure of any kind usually requires rebuilding or replacing all or part of a wall. Consult a qualified professional when major repairs or corrections are needed.

 

Have a few more questions about home inspections? Connect with Brad through his website.

 

 

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